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When It's Gone It's Gone, an online one-of-a-kind store, is selling this Royal Navy ejector seat that's been fitted with legs for use as an office desk-chair. Not sure what the ergonomics are like (I assume that a pilot's seat has to be at least mod...

When It's Gone It's Gone, an online one-of-a-kind store, is selling this Royal Navy ejector seat that's been fitted with legs for use as an office desk-chair. Not sure what the ergonomics are like (I assume that a pilot's seat has to be at least moderately comfy, though!), and as for price, it's a strictly "make an offer" affair.

Our Martin Baker Mk6 ejector seat for sale, originally used in a Royal Navy Buccaneer, has been fitted with a stainless steel frame, transforming it into the unique seat it is today! Complete with original 'chutes, harness and eject handles, the seat is guaranteed to turn heads in the office or look great at home!

The Mk.6MSB was fitted to the Buccaneer jet used by both RAF and Royal Navy. This seat in particular was fitted to XV157 which flew first with the Royal Navy from '66, including operating from the aircraft carrier HMS Eagle (where its was coded 107/E) and RAF squadrons from '69. XV157 was sadly scrapped in '91, at which point this seat was removed and converted to a training seat.

The ejector seat has been kept in its original authentic condition to preserve its' history; parts are original to the chair, including straps, parachute, seat cushion and handles. Paintwork has been kept as the original. Rockets are present - including pitch rockets - minus cartridge and propellant.

(via Crib Candy)






Nicholas Rougeux made this fabulous Menger sponge fractal out of mini Post-its, which he swears by for erecting fractals: Each Post-It was torn into 16 equal squares, then folded into units and assembled into the sponge. Post-its offer surprising...


Nicholas Rougeux made this fabulous Menger sponge fractal out of mini Post-its, which he swears by for erecting fractals:

Each Post-It was torn into 16 equal squares, then folded into units and assembled into the sponge.

Post-its offer surprisingly structural durability and are easy to get in large quantities making them ideal for assembling structures like these.

(via Kottke)






Nicholas Rougeux made this fabulous Menger sponge fractal out of mini Post-its, which he swears by for erecting fractals: Each Post-It was torn into 16 equal squares, then folded into units and assembled into the sponge. Post-its offer surprising...


Nicholas Rougeux made this fabulous Menger sponge fractal out of mini Post-its, which he swears by for erecting fractals:

Each Post-It was torn into 16 equal squares, then folded into units and assembled into the sponge.

Post-its offer surprisingly structural durability and are easy to get in large quantities making them ideal for assembling structures like these.

(via Kottke)






Nick Sayers is flying his math flag with this geometrically precise haircut where "the acute angles meet in groups of five, six, or seven, depending on the curvature. In the flatter areas, they meet in groups of six, like equilateral triangles, and ...

Nick Sayers is flying his math flag with this geometrically precise haircut where "the acute angles meet in groups of five, six, or seven, depending on the curvature. In the flatter areas, they meet in groups of six, like equilateral triangles, and in the areas of strong positive curvature they meet in groups of five, but in the negatively curved saddle at the back of the neck, there is a group of seven."

To make your own, Nick suggests you use a rhombic paper template starting at the crown, work outwards, and make aesthetic decisions about the 5-, 6-, or 7-way joints depending on local curvature. This instance of the design was cut by Hannah Barker after a test version a couple of months earlier by Summer Makepeace.






In "HELLO, I'M SHELLEY DUVALL !," a short video edited by Goddessshelleyduvall, Shelley Duvall repeatedly says the words, "Hello, I'm Shelley Duvall," while wearing a variety of outfits, for 55 seconds. If you don't understand what's great about that...

In "HELLO, I'M SHELLEY DUVALL !," a short video edited by Goddessshelleyduvall, Shelley Duvall repeatedly says the words, "Hello, I'm Shelley Duvall," while wearing a variety of outfits, for 55 seconds. If you don't understand what's great about that, you should try watching it. Mesemerizing.

HELLO, I'M SHELLEY DUVALL !

(Thanks, Fipi Lele!)






Deadspin editor A.J. Daulerio attempted to re-create Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Dock Ellis' infamous no-hitter of June 12, 1970 against the San Diego Padres, pitched while tripping on acid. Daulerio did so by dropping LSD, and re-enacting the game on...

Deadspin editor A.J. Daulerio attempted to re-create Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Dock Ellis' infamous no-hitter of June 12, 1970 against the San Diego Padres, pitched while tripping on acid. Daulerio did so by dropping LSD, and re-enacting the game on the Xbox version of MLB2K11. The resulting post is a great read.

Only once did I feel a brief flicker of hallucinatory terror. We were in a pizza parlor, in the friendly Cobble Hill section of Brooklyn, and I was having difficulty deciding which slice to purchase because even though my stomach said "plain slice" my mind begged for "chicken jalapeño with shredded garlic knots," which wasn't even available but, dammit, it should have been that day. It didn't feel like an unreasonable amount of time had passed. Then a slice of white pie was whooshed out of the giant oven by the pizzaman, and the gurgling cheese appeared angry with me. Maybe I was holding up the line. I ducked behind the soda fountain to refocus my fritzy thoughts for a couple extra minutes until that ricotta stopped messing with me. I ordered two plain slices quickly, then added on a slice of white because I felt the need to assert myself. Hey, white pizza. I eat you. You don't eat me.

Video, NYO story, Deadspin post, and historical background.

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